PLuS Alliance Prize for Research Innovation

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Stage: Competition Finished

For help with nominating and submitting, refer to these video guides:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BB7oFRW6V4 - Nominating

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5ozPAQ-_Ag - Accepting a nomination and managing teams

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-T-zTczpNpo&t=106s - Completing your submission


Q. What is the process for applying to the PLuS Alliance Prize?

A. Once on the Thinkable site for the PLuS Alliance Prize for either Education Innovation or Research Innovation, an eligible nominator must sign up or log-in by using their current ASU, KCL, or UNSW email address. The nominator will respond to some brief questions, including the name and email address of the candidate they put forward for the Prize and a brief description of the innovation. On submitting this content, the candidate will receive an email notification of the nomination. After activating their nomination, the candidate and the nominator will have access to complete the required fields and provide required approvals for the submission, via the Thinkable web portal. The Thinkable portal provides a checklist which is displayed when the candidate clicks on the Submit button, so they can keep track of and link to remaining items before finally accepting the terms and conditions and submitting the content.

(See Rules tab of the Thinkable site / section 1.4 of the Guidelines for eligibility of candidates and nominators)

(See information also for Thinkable Guides; and contact Thinkable if you have any technical difficulties with the portal)


Q. I have received a nomination and am able to see the summary information but cannot access the fields to complete the application. What do I do now?

A. Applicants need to click on the drop down list at their login name, top right of the page, and select Manage to access their nominations/ideas. Then click on the title (default) of the submission to edit/fill in details. 

The easiest way to go directly to manage the submission is for team members to share the submission link directly to other team members. For example if the nominator shares their submission link then those in the team will see the ‘Manage submission’ button which takes them straight to the questions fields/steps to fill in.


Q. What tips do you have for avoiding technical issues?

A. It is recommended that in submitting your nomination you use Google Chrome, Apple Safari or Mozilla Firefox.

Please note that if you have pop-ups blocked on your system, for example by Google Toolbar, this may limit access to the nomination submissions portal. If you experience difficulties with the system, you may need to allow pop-ups to proceed with your nomination submission.

(See information also for Thinkable Guides; and contact Thinkable if you have any technical difficulties with the portal)


Q. Do I need to complete the submission in one sitting or can I save as I go and return later?

A. Each of the judging criteria need to have some content entered during the one sitting and saved as a section (Questions). These can be returned to and edited at a later date. Other sections can be completed during other sittings. The Thinkable portal provides a checklist which is displayed when the candidate clicks on the Submit button, so they can keep track of and link to remaining items before finally accepting the terms and conditions and submitting the content. All sections need to be completed by midnight 12 May (MST).


Q. Who can apply for the PLuS Alliance Prize?

A. Application to the PLuS Alliance Prize is a collaborative effort, commencing with the nomination of a candidate by a current professional or academic staff member, student, Emeritus Professor, Adjunct Professor, or alumni of a PLuS Alliance member University (i.e., Arizona State University, King’s College London, UNSW Sydney). Candidates may be individuals, groups, or organisations from any country, and may include staff or students and other members of the PLuS Alliance member Universities, or come from outside these institutes.

(See below and also Rules tab for eligibility of candidates and nominators)


Q. Who is eligible to be a nominator?

A. Eligibility of nominators:

  • Nominators need to be a current professional or academic staff member, student, Emeritus Professor, Adjunct Professor, or alumni of a PLuS Alliance member University, and must provide their university email address for verification of compliance with this requirement;
  • Nominators must be over the age of 18;
  • Nominators may not nominate themselves (whether as an individual candidate, or as one of a group or organisation);
  • Nominators may only nominate once (i.e., in support of an individual/group or organisation in either research innovation or education innovation);
  • Nominations must be submitted in accordance with these Guidelines via the Thinkable web portal for education innovation, by the due date of 12 May, 2017.


Q. Who is eligible to be a candidate?

A. Eligibility of candidates:

  • Candidates may be individuals, groups or organisations from any country;
  • Candidates may include staff or students of the PLuS Alliance member Universities;
  • Each candidate (individual, group or organisation) must be nominated by a nominator who meets the eligibility criteria in these Guidelines, and nominations must be made in accordance with these Guidelines;
  • Candidates may only be nominated for the Prize in one category (i.e., either research innovation or education innovation) and must demonstrate that they satisfy the criteria for the category


Q. What are the PLuS Alliance themes and what do they refer to?

A. The overarching focus of the PLuS Alliance is developing sustainable solutions to global challenges. The Alliance has identified four key themes in which its expertise and focus is utilised through learning and research:

Sustainability

Sustainability is the need to ensure that the components and processes of the natural world are not diminished and continue to provide human populations with ecosystem goods and services as well as maintaining ecosystems in their own right. In this sense, environmental sustainability aims to meet the needs of humans for access to environmental resources for the survival of both current and future generations of humans, and to sustain biodiversity across the globe. Environmental sustainability is an inherently interdisciplinary concept, with interacting economic, ecological, technological, socio-political, philosophical, governance and legal dimensions. These interacting dimensions are key in both determining the goals of environmental sustainability and in crafting suitable and effective policy responses. In terms of responses, there is a wide range of opportunities to explore where human resourcefulness and strategic thinking can focus on reducing our demands and on maintaining and improving key natural resources of air, water, energy, land and biodiversity.

Global health

Global health is concerned with rethinking the meaning of health and wellbeing in the context of globalisation. It is concerned with research and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide. In 2015, countries adopted a set of goals and targets to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all as part of a new sustainable agenda for the next 15 years. The 3rd of the United Nations 17 sustainable development goals is to ‘ensure healthy lives and to promote well-being for all at all ages’. The document argues that ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages is essential to sustainable development, and that efforts are needed to fully eradicate a wide range of diseases and address many different persistent and emerging health issues.

Social justice

Social justice is an underlying principle for peaceful and prosperous coexistence within and among nations. We uphold the principles of social justice when we promote gender equality or the rights of indigenous peoples and migrants. We advance social justice when we remove barriers that people face because of gender, age, race, ethnicity, religion, culture or disability. Efforts to promote social justice include poverty eradication, the promotion of full employment and decent work, gender equity and access to social well-being and justice for all. Distributive justice is concerned with the way in which resources are allocated within society, including patterns of inequality relating to gender, sexuality, ethnicity and race, and the intergenerational transmission of poverty and disadvantage. Global distributive justice engages with issues of patterns of inequality around the world, including those driven or influenced by climate change, urbanisation, and social, cultural or religious traditions and norms.

Technology & Innovation

The technological innovation system is a concept developed within the scientific field of innovation studies which serves to explain the nature and rate of technological change. A Technological Innovation System can be defined as ‘a dynamic network of agents interacting in a specific economic/industrial area under a particular institutional infrastructure and involved in the generation, diffusion, and utilization of technology’. The approach may be applied to at least three levels of analysis: to a technology in the sense of a knowledge-field, to a product or to an artefact, or to a set of related products and artefacts aimed at satisfying a particular (societal) function’. With respect to the latter, the approach has especially proven itself in explaining why and how sustainable (energy) technologies have developed and diffused into a society, or have failed to do so.

(To learn more about the PLuS Alliance, visit the website: PLuSAlliance.org)

 Funding Available

$25,000

Host

The PLuS Alliance is a collaborative effort of top tier research universities and educational leaders: King's College London, Arizona State University and the UNSW Sydney. It is by leveraging the combination of our expertise and strengths that we will be able to impact and address global challenges, improving lives around the world.